Publically Airing Some Thoughts on Pubic Hair

AMERICAN-APARREL_2793970b

There has been a lot of chatter recently about both the fuzzy and furless pubis. A couple of weeks ago, there was a lot of coverage of Cameron Diaz’s new written endeavor, The Body Book because it features an essay entitled “In Praise of Pubes,” and currently, American Apparel is getting press because their mannequins have merkins peaking out of their panties.

I know that feminists have been known to debate the “feministy-ness” of how one decides to relate to her pubic hair – “to nair or to hair” you might say.  (Just so you know, I’m not gonna partake in a pubic hair pros and cons list, so if that’s what you’re looking for, move on.)  There are lot of thoughts surrounding this debate, and while I may lean one way or another when I’m listening to smart girls discuss their very nuanced positions on having hair down there, I ultimately think that conversations of this nature expose the very gray spectrum that feminism needs to embrace.

Let me back track. I have pubic hair. This is a choice I’ve made based on my own life experiences with my body. When I was ten years old, I didn’t sleep much. It was a drag for my parents, but after some seriously valid attempts at trying to get me to sleep at night they gave up, and let me traipse about the house while they were sleeping. It was on a night like this I discovered my first pubic hair. I was proud of that one little curly cue – proud enough to wake up my mother to tell her what I’d found. For me, that lone coarse strand marked my shift from child to pubescent teen. It was a bodily triumph.  I know, it’s a ridiculous story, but it’s mine and that’s why I have pubic hair. It has meaning to me, because I was excited to meet my pubes so why would I banish them.

Let me tell you another story; this one’s second hand, but it helps make my point so bear with me. A couple of years ago a friend of mine went to study abroad in France. She was about four years older than the other students in her study abroad program. One night, over a bottle of wine, she had a conversation with a couple of 20-year-old guys who felt that if a woman’s labia wasn’t naked, then that women was disgusting and not a viable sexual option. Arguably, from a feminist position, the perception of these douche bags would make a terrible justification for bearing your labia – because you’d be making this choice based on what others think. Not on your relationship to your body.

Shave your pubis if you look in the mirror and the naked version looks sexy to you, or if you exercise a lot and your nether hair is prone to crotch rot. Go au-naturale because you’ve done research and you feel like pubes protect you from bacterial infections or you’re excited by their relationship to pheromones.  It doesn’t matter. What matters is that you own your crotch, make decisions based on your relationship to your parts, and voice the opinion that other feminists have a right to be masters of their bodily universe and self define. In other words, it doesn’t matter if you choose to sport a 70s style full-fledged bush or not – as long as you think about it and make a choice based on your needs. This is the gray land of actual feminist empowerment.

What do we make of the American Apparel merkins? It’s up to you. Personally, I feel like they’re creepy, but I have other feminist body-positive friends who love them. As feminists, we are big enough to enjoy this publicity stunt for the conversations it starts. We can go back and forth about whether AA’s merkins forward a hipster resurgence of a furry pubic sensibility or make the bushy bush a joke.  It doesn’t matter where you land – chat about it, think about it, and in the end go with your gut. Living within feminism means having a personal opinion and trusting it.

Side note: a couple of months ago XOJane’s Emily McCombs had a feminist twitter war on this topic and wrote an article that dismissed the necessity for a feminist discussion of pubic hair because she felt there were more pressing issues for feminists to discuss. I get it, I do. I still think we’re having issues understanding what it means to live in an empowered space – one which enables us to choose freely and navigate our own course, so I have deemed this discussion of one’s right to pube or not to pube still worthy.

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5 thoughts on “Publically Airing Some Thoughts on Pubic Hair

  1. Pingback: Publically Airing Some Thoughts on Pubic Hair | Feminist Cupcake

  2. To clarify – I mean to say that we need to be aware of why we are making out choices and we need to be hyper critical of the media and the bodies that get represented. We are living in a culture that favors heteronormative standard that a hypersexualized and over photoshopped. And often this leads to an ideology that is ill informed – like the 20 year old boys I mentioned in my piece. I think it would do us a lot of good to show natural images… Understanding why we are making choices is absolutely necessary. And educating our your men about the fact that women’s bodies are clean and belonging to women is clearly necessary.

    That said, while I do have pubic hair, I don’t have armpit hair – cause I don’t like it. And I don’t have to have it. It’s my body to do as I please – and I will absolutely defend the woman who does have armpit hair. Because my brand of feminism dictates that I deserve the right to make choices about my own body and these choices are not anyone else’s choices to make.

    This is the gray I am discussing – taking on and discussing the nature of what the culture does is important feminist action – but we cannot let the culture affect the chices we make about our own bodies.

    • I’m a guy and I remember my first pubic hair. Such a proud moment!:) The real milestone was when my bush was first fully mature.

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  4. Pingback: “Strange Tales From the Doc” #24 Here’s another “Growing up Strange” story for you friends…. | Dr. Strange Records

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